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TheClash
11/27/11, 05:26 PM
It started with Tunisia and the Arab Spring, then spread to Spain and the Indignados movement, to Chile with the massive student mobilization for an end to education for profit, to England with the urban riots, to Athens with the massive demonstrations against the tyranny of the Euro and the financial markets, and then to New York with the Occupy Wall Street movement.

Two comparable uprisings have rocked the course of history.

The revolutions of 1848 in Europe-known as the Spring Time of the Peoples-challenged monarchs, aristocrats and autocrats alike as Karl Marx and Frederick Engels penned the Communist Manifesto. Disturbances and revolutions occurred in more than 50 countries and thousands died with untold numbers fleeing abroad.

Then, exactly one century and two decades later, a broad anti-systemic movement roiled the globe on many fronts: the Tet offensive in Vietnam, the global anti-war movement, the student and worker uprising in Paris, the Prague Spring in Czechoslovakia, the riots in Chicago at the Democratic convention and the Mexican student protests that led to the massacre at Tlatelolco Plaza.

None of these historic revolts was successful in terms of taking power, but they changed the world in profound ways, just as the great revolt of 2011 is doing.

http://www.freespeech.org/blog/global-revolt-2011

Unregistered
11/28/11, 07:34 AM
very good post
first time i see someone besides me seeing it
lol
one thing is new this time:
the global revolt has weapons of mass-communication, instant communication in real time, p2p
this eliminates the need for leaders
which was what made the others "fail"

Unregistered
11/28/11, 07:39 AM
very good post
first time i see someone besides me seeing it
lol
one thing is new this time:
the global revolt has weapons of mass-communication, instant communication in real time, p2p
this eliminates the need for leaders
which was what made the others "fail"
I tried to post words to that effect on the "freespeech" blog in the link and it censored me. :lol:

But yes, this is the first time in 100 years that the people have had a voice.

Unregistered
11/28/11, 07:42 AM
The critical revolutionary factor of the web is how fast it is. It's the printing press turbocharged to lightspeed. As the printing press shattered the church and the ancien regime the web will bring down the oligarchy.

Unregistered
11/28/11, 08:13 AM
yep, the web makes all these revolts (including some you didn't mention :) ) one united uprising

without "leading groups" which could be cut off, influenced........
they can do that still, butt it has no effect on the revolt as a whole anymore
we don't need no longer anyone to tell us what's going on and what to do
everybody can do it now


why did they censor you? rofl

Unregistered
11/28/11, 08:30 AM
yep, the web makes all these revolts (including some you didn't mention :) ) one united uprising

without "leading groups" which could be cut off, influenced........
they can do that still, butt it has no effect on the revolt as a whole anymore
we don't need no longer anyone to tell us what's going on and what to do
everybody can do it now


This is the strategy of leaderless resistance. Flash mobs, flash revolutions.

All of this ends in a heartbeat.

JesusMarx
11/28/11, 08:32 AM
http://www.freespeech.org/blog/global-revolt-2011

Nice map. Too bad it's not bigger.

Unregistered
11/28/11, 02:17 PM
This is the strategy of leaderless resistance. Flash mobs, flash revolutions.

All of this ends in a heartbeat.

as long as one heart still is beating it does not end :))

Peter Quincy Taggart
11/28/11, 03:36 PM
as long as one heart still is beating it does not end :))

Never give up, never surrender

Groucho
11/29/11, 06:09 AM
SANTIAGO, Chile — Geography student and young communist Camilla Vallejo needed only to tweet to marshal thousands of her 320,000 followers, with kitchenware in hand, to the streets in protest of the steep costs of education.

“After 5 months we mobilized, more of the same and continued repression more brutal than ever. Bang pots today at 20.30 hrs!,” the 23-year-old tweeted in early October following a large confrontation with police.

Now nearly two months later, Vallejo, the public face of Chile’s student movement, still marches one Converse sneaker-clad foot in front of the other alongside hundreds of thousands of students almost every week. The masses are fed up with Chile’s highly privatized school system.

The marches, which usually end with violent clashes with riot police wielding tear gas, are only a slice of their effort. Students have also ditched class for six months, jammed their now-rusting desks and chairs through school fences, and dragged their sleeping bags inside to fort up in empty classrooms. They staged a flash-mob rendition of “Thriller” by Michael Jackson at President Sebastian Piñera’s front door in a performance that went viral on YouTube within Chile. Keeping their eyes peeled and Twitter feeds open for inspiration and support from protests abroad, they’ve publicized their effort with a bilingual social-media campaign to muster global support.
http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/2011/11/chile-students/

Unregistered
11/29/11, 07:09 AM
SANTIAGO, Chile — Geography student and young communist Camilla Vallejo needed only to tweet to marshal thousands of her 320,000 followers, with kitchenware in hand, to the streets in protest of the steep costs of education.

“After 5 months we mobilized, more of the same and continued repression more brutal than ever. Bang pots today at 20.30 hrs!,” the 23-year-old tweeted in early October following a large confrontation with police.

Now nearly two months later, Vallejo, the public face of Chile’s student movement, still marches one Converse sneaker-clad foot in front of the other alongside hundreds of thousands of students almost every week. The masses are fed up with Chile’s highly privatized school system.

The marches, which usually end with violent clashes with riot police wielding tear gas, are only a slice of their effort. Students have also ditched class for six months, jammed their now-rusting desks and chairs through school fences, and dragged their sleeping bags inside to fort up in empty classrooms. They staged a flash-mob rendition of “Thriller” by Michael Jackson at President Sebastian Piñera’s front door in a performance that went viral on YouTube within Chile. Keeping their eyes peeled and Twitter feeds open for inspiration and support from protests abroad, they’ve publicized their effort with a bilingual social-media campaign to muster global support.
http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/2011/11/chile-students/

There's nothing that influential in the United States. Protesters here can barely figure out what they're against, let alone what they're for.

Unregistered
11/29/11, 03:55 PM
The elite are scared. At the end of the day they can't defend themselves. They need their mercenaries, and more important they need there to be a minimal population of real insurgents willing to die to overthrow the elite. Just a few hundred would inflict incalculable damage on the system. That's how you can know that terrorism is a hoax. If there were thousands of real terrorists with middle eastern oil money backing them up you wouldn't have a big attack once a decade, you'd have one every fucking month.

Unregistered
11/30/11, 07:32 AM
Two million on strike over pensions, the biggest walkout for a generation.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-15953806

Unregistered
12/02/11, 05:41 AM
For the past two months, a website called Global Revolution TV has become the main video hub for the Occupy Wall Street movement. Featuring live video feeds from New York and dozens of other cities hosting Occupy protests, the site has transformed how protests are covered and observed. When OWS protesters hold a general assembly in Zuccotti Park, the gathering is usually live-streamed across the world. When police raided the park early on Tuesday, it was caught on live stream, as well. We speak to one of the site’s co-founders, Vlad Teichberg. He is a former derivatives trader who gave up a life in the financial world to work on video activism. "This project started officially with the beginning of the New York occupation, although similar versions of this project have been done in the past for other actions and revolts," Teichberg says. "People think of Occupy Wall Street as like an American revolution. It has its roots, though, in the Arab Spring. Obviously it inspired a lot of things. And it has very direct roots in the Spanish revolution."

http://www.democracynow.org/2011/11/18/the_revolution_will_be_live_streamed

Unregistered
12/02/11, 05:51 AM
VLAD TEICHBERG: Well, basically, we believe that one of the fundamental aspects to this protest is setting up a functioning media center out of the protest, because it allows many people to work together to push out the message of what is being done, why it’s being done, and so on. So, in Zuccotti, when we got in, like one of the first things we did was we got a generator to set up some basic power, because they cut off all of the city power from the park. And we’re basically setting up on two tables in the park, which set up a basically media center, which was basically a bunch of people doing video and a bunch of people doing twittering and so-called social media. It involved not just twittering; it involved all kinds of social websites. It involved a lot of writing and a lot of communicating via text. And those two—and all those people basically worked together for the next month or so trying to push out the message. And about a week and a week and a half into the protests, we finally broke through the mainstream media wall. At least the event was no longer boycotted or blocked. And, you know, the rest was history.

Unregistered
12/04/11, 09:24 AM
INTERNET RISING (http://acidpulse.net/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=12842)

In the early days of the printing press before copyright law you had a local version of nearly unregulated free speech. With thousands of small merchants with their own small printing presses WRITTEN ideas could go viral for the very first time.

This broke the power of the Catholic church which had depended on book production being labor intensive, every manuscript hand copied by monks.

The rise of consolidated media corporations returned us, for a time, to the days of enforced media orthodoxy, every publisher of any influence being absorbed by moneyed interests. The low point of media freedom was World War II, when Americans willingly accepted slavery (the draft) and massive tax rates to establish the empire.

The slow evolution of alternative media - mimeographed newsletters, xeroxed posters, direct mail, pubic access cable - created some anti-globalist elements of the countercultures on the left and the right, but they were cottage industry operations and had no prestige or reach.

The internet has led to the greatest reversal in media power distribution ever. From seven media conglomerates deciding what everyone should think in 1990 to nearly everyone having a digital publishing system and broadcast studio on their desktop by 2005.

We must use this.

FreedomFighter
01/10/12, 03:32 PM
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